2019-2020 Season

Camerata Nova is excited to present a new season of groundbreaking concerts. See below to purchase subscriptions, tickets, and to donate.

ROSA [mys.ti.ka]

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2019 AT 7:30 PM and SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2019 AT 7:30 PM
LE VENDREDI 13 DÉCEMBRE 2019 À 19 H 30 et LE SAMEDI 14 DÉCEMBRE 2019 À 19 H 30
CRESCENT FORT ROUGE UNITED CHURCH

Charismatic and forward-thinking curator/conductor, John Wiens opens our season with a concert of glorious Renaissance music by Gabrieli, Bovicelli, Mouton, Lassus, Praetorius, and contemporary Balfour. This concert features the extraordinary Bruce Dickey, one of a handful of musicians worldwide who have dedicated themselves to reviving the cornetto, about whom BBC Music Magazine stated, “…Dickey’s cornetto playing would charm the skin off a snake.” Bruce is joined by Elinor Frey, viola da gamba, and Madeleine Owen, theorbo.

Le concepteur et chef de chœur charismatique et avant-gardiste, John Wiens, amorce notre saison avec un concert de musique glorieuse de la Renaissance par Gabrieli, Bovicelli, Mouton, Lassus et Praetorius et le compositeur contemporain Balfour. Le concert mettra en vedette l’extraordinaire Bruce Dickey, l’un des rares musiciens du monde à s’être consacré à faire redécouvrir le cornet. BBC Music Magazine a dit de lui : « … le cornet de Dickey charmerait un serpent au point de le faire sortir de sa peau. » Bruce sera accompagné d’Elinor Frey (viole da gambe) et Madeleine Owen (théorbe).

La Nef and Seán Dagher, Sea Songs & Shanties

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2020 AT 7:30 PM
LE JEUDI 13 FÉVRIER 2020 À 19 H 30
WEST END CULTURAL CENTRE

“When a song can quiet two dozen drunks, you can be confident that there is something there that’s worth listening to,” says music director Seán Dagher. Camerata Nova has invited the top early music group, La Nef from Montreal, to collaborate on a program of fun and historic sea songs and shanties. Ross Brownlee, conductor/singer; Seán Dagher, curator/conductor

« Quand une chanson peut faire taire deux douzaines d’ivrognes, on peut être sûr que ça vaut la peine d’être entendu », fait remarquer Seán Dagher, directeur musical. Camerata Nova a invité l’excellent groupe de musique ancienne, La Nef, de Montréal, pour présenter en collaboration un programme de chansons marines historiques et amusantes. Ross Brownlee, chef de chœur/chanteur; Seán Dagher, concepteur/chef d’orchestre

Captive

SATURDAY, MAY 9, 2020 AT 7:30 PM and SUNDAY, MAY 10, 2020 AT 3:00 PM
LE SAMEDI 9 MAI 2020 À 19 H 30 et LE DIMANCHE 10 MAI 2020 À 15 H
NEEGINAN CENTRE

Captive is the third in our series of Truth and Reconciliation concerts, featuring new works on the theme of “captivity” by Indigenous composers/performers, including electro-acoustic specialist Eliot Britton, hip-hop artist Zoey Roy, cellist Cris Derksen, our very own Andrew Balfour, and more. Under Andrew’s leadership, we’ve been pushing the envelope on contemporary Indigenous music for more than ten years, discovering and collaborating with incredibly talented Indigenous artists and helping to bridge Indigenous and settler communities. Andrew Balfour curator/composer, Mel Braun conductor.

Captive est le troisième de notre série de concerts sur la vérité et de la réconciliation, et comprendra de nouvelles œuvres sur le thème de la « captivité » par des compositeurs/interprètes autochtones, dont le spécialiste électroacoustique Eliot Britton, l’artiste hip-hop Zoey Roy, la violoncelliste Cris Derksen et notre propre Andrew Balfour. Sous la direction d’Andrew, nous repoussons les limites de la musique autochtone contemporaine depuis plus de 10 ans, en découvrant des artistes autochtones incroyables et en collaborant avec eux, et en aidant à rapprocher la communauté autochtone et celle des colons. Andrew Balfour, concepteur/compositeur; Mel Braun, chef de chœur

 

 

2019-20 Special Performances

Santa Claus Parade Day Concert

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2019 AT 2:30 PM
LE SAMEDI 16 NOVEMBRE 2019 À 14 H 30
MANITOBA HYDRO BUILDING

Get in the festive spirit before watching the Manitoba Hydro Santa Clause Parade! Our FREE performance features Christmas classics, Camerata Nova originals, as well as some sing-alongs! Vic Pankratz, curator/conductor.

Mettez-vous dans l’esprit des fêtes avant d’aller voir le défilé du Père Noël de Manitoba Hydro! Ce concert GRATUIT comprend des classiques de Noël, des pièces originales de Camerata Nova et l’occasion de chanter avec nous! Vic Pankratz.

Of All the Flowers

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2020 AT 7:30 PM
LE MARDI 28 JANVIER 2020 À 19 H 30
CENTENNIAL CONCERT HALL

Camerata Nova has been invited to perform its own concert at the 2020 Winnipeg New Music Festival. Of All the Flowers is quintessential Camerata Nova, mixing early and new, chant, drone and electro-acoustic, featuring a new commission by Montreal’s Terri Hron and music by Gesualdo, Machaut, Kouyoumdjian, and more. Discounted rates are offered to Camerata Nova season ticket subscribers. Harry Stafylakis, curator; Mel Braun, curator and conductor.

Camerata Nova a été invité à présenter son propre concert dans le cadre du Festival de musique nouvelle 2020 de Winnipeg. Of All the Flowers sera l’essence même de Camerata Nova, mélangeant musique ancienne et nouvelle, plain-chant, harmoniques et électroacoustique, avec une nouvelle œuvre de Terri Hron de Montréal et de la musique par Gesualdo, Machaut, Kouyoumdjian et autres. Des tarifs réduits seront offerts aux abonnés de Camerata Nova. Harry Stafylakis, concepteur; Mel Braun, concepteur et chef de chœur.

DONATE TODAY

Camerata Nova is a registered not-for-profit charitable organization. Exploring, taking risks, and developing exciting new programming, takes time, energy, and money.

Donate Now Through CanadaHelps.org!

Or, click here to find out more about donating.

Composer Andrew Balfour Featured in the Globe and Mail

Choral maestro Andrew Balfour pursues his Indigenous identity through music

There are things you expect to hear from a classical-music composer like Andrew Balfour: that he grew up singing in a church choir. That he began playing an instrument at an early age – in his case, trumpet. That while other kids were grinding out guitar licks, miming Bruce Springsteen or David Bowie (he grew up in the 1970s), Balfour was air-conducting Beethoven.

Then there are the parts of Balfour’s life story that make eyes widen,… READ MORE at The Globe and Mail

Composer Andrew Balfour, is the founder and artistic director of Camerata Nova.
AARON VINCENT ELKAIM/THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Historical Music and Sleuthing by John Wiens

Being involved in historical music, as I often am, requires no small amount of sleuthing. In the time that I find to read historical documents, the reports of others who have read them, and the problems that arise from the misinterpretation of those documents by sincere and well-meaning scholars (including myself), has led to confusion over the years. And so, when one finds a clue, one must be quick to doubt – to fact check – and to look further to find reviews by other renowned scholars which lend either weight to, or contest, a written argument. These reviews are most often found in journals and magazines and are a critical part of any historical musicians’ life – just as important as the reports themselves. For it is in these reports – and the expertise of those who write them, that we must invariably either put our trust or discount.

John Wiens is the curator/conductor for Death by Chocolate: The Life of Henry Purcell (May 4-5, 2019)

How does one do that? How does one choose who to read and who to ignore? How does one decide if a well-known conductor is fictionalizing to sell a few extra books or recordings? Well, luckily, there are many experts world-wide who one can turn to in a moment such as this. Often, they are editors of a collection of essays on a particular topic, and they are usually happy to set the record straight in the service of fine music. This summer in Ghent I was set straight a number of times on elements that I myself had been incorrect about, and I’m grateful for that.

Reading historical documents is not for the faint of heart. One must have a great passion for the music that cannot be satisfied by simply knowing the scores or listening to a recording and intuiting. For, it is a combination of the document, and the score, and the scenario surrounding the score and its composer that gives the clearest picture.

This preface from “Henry Purcell and the Restoration Theatre” by Robert Etheridge Moore sums up the hardest part of this task: “Specialists will inevitably find a great deal here that they already know, indeed whole pages that they will doubtless want to skim, but from the reports of colleagues in departments of music as well as from my own experience with even the most advanced students of English literature, it is quite clear that literary and musical studies seldom meet. A student of literature and a student of music are virtually never combined in the same individual. Outside their own field of study their ignorance can be described only as sizeable. (Unhappily this generalization, not lightly made, applies frequently to the podium no less than to the arena.”

So, as we turn to the music of Henry Purcell, with all this in mind, we are faced with some surprising situations – not the least of which is the wonderful fictions of his life – the fantastical stories that were generated either during his life or by those who were destined to write about it – for uncertain reasons. For instance, should we dare to turn to the internet in search of clues about the life and times of dear Henry, we find some wonderful fictions which we may or may not be able to substantiate. We chose the title for the concert – Death by Chocolate – from one of the rumors that is hardest to believe but makes for a snappy title. There were chocolate houses in London at that time and the thesis is that Purcell lost his life as a result of drinking some impure liquid chocolate. Rumors are tough to substantiate, especially rumors that are hundreds of years old, but if it is true, that’s a scrummy way to go.

The most common rumor of the time was that Purcell died because his wife locked him out in the cold because he returned home “heated with wine.” This rumor we can find an origin to – it was started by the family of the celebrated Bass John Gostling. John Gostling, as many of you may know, was the Anglican cleric whose Basso Profundo gained incredible notoriety thanks to the music of Henry Purcell. He was a bass with an extraordinary range of two and a half octaves. It is surmised that the Gostling’s began this rumor because they didn’t like Purcell’s wife, and blamed her for Purcell’s death. She likely didn’t deserve that blame, but the Gostlings were to lose standing at court after the death of Henry and needed to rationalize that somehow – despite the fact that the Purcell family lost so much more.

And just to try and put a little context around all of this, rumors at that time were part of the fun (and often the meanness) of life, depending on the rumor. The rumor often portrayed a general attitude of the public towards important figures of the day. For instance, Mary of Modena (the wife of King James II) was a firmly unpopular figure amongst the British. She gave birth to a son, and it was widely rumoured that he was a “changeling”, brought into the birth chamber in a warming pan, in order to perpetuate her husband’s Catholic Stuart dynasty. That’s a pretty mean thing to say and shows what lengths the powerful and the poor alike would go to if they wanted someone to become unpopular in the minds of the hoi polloi. 

There is more, much more, that we can say about the life of Henry Purcell. If you join us at the concert there are still a few thoughts that haven’t been shared in this blog – thoughts that will both deepen some mysteries about his life, and perhaps bring a fitting conclusion to the rumors about his life. – John Wiens

May 4, 2019 at 7:30 pm and May 5, 2019 at 3:00 pm at Crescent Fort Rouge United Church (Pre-concert talks at 6:45 pm on Saturday and 2:15 pm on Sunday)

In this concert curated and conducted by John Wiens, Camerata Nova seeks to showcase choral works by Henry Purcell (1659-1695) and to explore the life of this composer, arguably the greatest of the English Baroque period. Join us to find out how cocoa can kill…

Death by Chocolate offers top quality performers and powerful repertoire – a rare musical treat. Four Winnipeg vocal soloists: Dayna Lamothe, soprano; Jane Fingler, soprano; James Magnus-Johnson, tenor; and Jereme Wall, bass will be joined by early music instrumentalists Claudine St-Arnauld, violin; Jeremy Buzasch, violin; Greg Hay, viola; Yuri Hooker, cello; Andrew Goodlett, bass; and Michael McKay, organ continuo.

Adding some flair, we will also be joined by exciting young Canadian countertenor, Daniel Cabena, who specializes in early and contemporary performance.  The countertenor voice has a caché and curiosity that is sure to send many a heart afflutter.  Repertoire will include: Rondeau from AbdelazarO Sing unto the LordMy Heart Is InditingHear My Prayer, O LordTe Deum and Jubilate in D; plus Three Funeral Sentences.

TICKETS

Tickets are available online at cameratanova.com, at McNally Robinson Booksellers, by phone
(204.918.4547), or at the door.

ABOUT JOHN WIENS

A dynamic conductor hailed for “awe-inspiring” (Winnipeg Free Press) performances, John Wiens has cemented his reputation as one of Canada’s finest chamber choir conductors.

John has appeared on stages across the world, pursuing an innovative path as a programmer known for an uncommonly wide repertoire. John’s inquisitiveness and love of investigation often results in the performance of new music, and music from before 1700. His conducting career has ranged from Belgium (University Chorus for L’Université Catholique de Louvain) to Morocco (Ensemble Voca Me) to Montreal (St. Matthias Anglican Church, Westmount) and Winnipeg (Polycoro, Camerata Nova).

Born into a musical family in small – town Manitoba, John aspired to be a musician from an early age.  He studied violin at the age of four, and sang in choirs throughout his childhood. He holds degrees in Violin, Voice, and Conducting, from CMU, McGill, and the University of Sherbrooke respectively. He has studied privately  with Paul van Nevel, (director of the Huelgas Ensemble), Christopher Jackson (SMAM)Andrew Megill (University of Illinois), Konstantin Krechler, and Donna Grescoe.

John is constantly expanding his knowledge of music ancient and modern. He has conducted the premiers of works by Andrew BalfourNorbert PalejT. Pat CarrabréNeil Weisenthel, and Isaiah Ceccarelli, and regularly programs repertoire by many of Canada’s leading composers including Anna Sokolovic, Mychael Danna, Vivian Fung, Nicolas Gilbert, and Oleksa Lozowchuk.

When not performing, John is in more and more demand as a clinician, adjudicator, and juror, participating in these activities as often as his busy schedule will allow. He is honored to work with and support new talent. He loves spending his spare time with his wife and sons in the kitchen or outdoors, and he is an avid fencer.

DONATE

Camerata Nova is a registered not-for-profit charitable organization. Exploring, taking risks, and developing exciting new programming, takes time, energy, and money.

Click here to find out more about donating.

 

 

 

Upcoming Concert – Death by Chocolate: The Life of Henry Purcell

May 4, 2019 at 7:30 pm and May 5, 2019 at 3:00 pm at Crescent Fort Rouge United Church (Pre-concert talks at 6:45 pm on Saturday and 2:45 pm on Sunday)

In this concert curated and conducted by John Wiens, Camerata Nova seeks to showcase choral works by Henry Purcell (1659-1695) and to explore the life of this composer, arguably the greatest of the English Baroque period. Join us to find out how cocoa can kill…

Death by Chocolate offers top quality performers and powerful repertoire – a rare musical treat. Four Winnipeg vocal soloists: Dayna Lamothe, soprano; Jane Fingler, soprano; James Magnus-Johnson, tenor; and Jereme Wall, bass will be joined by early music instrumentalists Claudine St-Arnauld, violin; Jeremy Buzasch, violin; Greg Hay, viola; Yuri Hooker, cello; Andrew Goodlett, bass; and Michael McKay, organ continuo.

Canadian countertenor Daniel Cabena is highly regarded in both Canada and Europe for prize-winning performances ranging from baroque to contemporary repertoire.

Adding some flair, we will also be joined by exciting young Canadian countertenor, Daniel Cabena, who specializes in early and contemporary performance.  The countertenor voice has a caché and curiosity that is sure to send many a heart afflutter.  Repertoire will include: Rondeau from AbdelazarO Sing unto the LordMy Heart Is InditingHear My Prayer, O LordTe Deum and Jubilate in D; plus Three Funeral Sentences.

John Wiens is the artistic director and co-founder of Polycoro Chamber Choir, a co-curator of Camerata Nova, and begins a new post as Director of Music of the renowned professional chamber choir at St. John’s Anglican Church, Elora in May 2019.

A dynamic conductor hailed for “awe-inspiring” (Winnipeg Free Press) performances, John Wiens has cemented his reputation as one of Canada’s finest chamber choir conductors.

John has appeared on stages across the world, pursuing an innovative path as a programmer known for an uncommonly wide repertoire. John’s inquisitiveness and love of investigation often results in the performance of new music, and music from before 1700. His conducting career has ranged from Belgium (University Chorus for L’Université Catholique de Louvain) to Morocco (Ensemble Voca Me) to Montreal (St. Matthias Anglican Church, Westmount) and Winnipeg (Polycoro, Camerata Nova).

Born into a musical family in small – town Manitoba, John aspired to be a musician from an early age.  He studied violin at the age of four, and sang in choirs throughout his childhood. He holds degrees in Violin, Voice, and Conducting, from CMU, McGill, and the University of Sherbrooke respectively. He has studied privately  with Paul van Nevel, (director of the Huelgas Ensemble), Christopher Jackson (SMAM)Andrew Megill (University of Illinois), Konstantin Krechler, and Donna Grescoe.

John is constantly expanding his knowledge of music ancient and modern. He has conducted the premiers of works by Andrew BalfourNorbert PalejT. Pat CarrabréNeil Weisenthel, and Isaiah Ceccarelli, and regularly programs repertoire by many of Canada’s leading composers including Anna Sokolovic, Mychael Danna, Vivian Fung, Nicolas Gilbert, and Oleksa Lozowchuk.

When not performing, John is in more and more demand as a clinician, adjudicator, and juror, participating in these activities as often as his busy schedule will allow. He is honored to work with and support new talent. He loves spending his spare time with his wife and sons in the kitchen or outdoors, and he is an avid fencer.

TICKETS

Tickets are available online at cameratanova.com, at McNally Robinson Booksellers, by phone
(204.918.4547), or at the door.

DONATE

Camerata Nova is a registered not-for-profit charitable organization. Exploring, taking risks, and developing exciting new programming, takes time, energy, and money.

Click here to find out more about donating.

CNova’s History of Collaboration – Thoughts on the Prairie Songbook by Mel Braun

Camerata Nova has a long history of collaborations and the Prairie Songbook is no exception. Whether it’s early, contemporary, and Indigenous-infused music, we always welcome the opportunity to explore new ways of collaborating. The Prairie Songbook collaboration has several interesting angles.

We begin with our crackerjack band, comprised of cousins Micah Braun, Jason Pankratz and David Pankratz, who are collaborating as a unit with their dads, Mel Braun, and Vic Pankratz, for the first time. Veterans of local bands Quinzy, Begonia, The Nods, and Jicah, these terrific singers, players, and songwriters anchor this event with their stunning vocal and instrumental talents.

Crack band, comprised of cousins Micah Braun, Jason Pankratz and David Pankratz, collaborating with their dads, Mel Braun and Vic Pankratz, as well as the amazing CNova choir, for the first time

Singer-songwriter Raine Hamilton, fresh off the success of her new album “Night Sky”, brings her unique fiddle style and beautiful voice as our special guest artist. A former Medieval Musicologist, Raine has a fresh approach to song-writing. Her paean to Hildegard of Bingen has to be heard to be believed, a perfect opportunity for Camerata’s characteristic drones and overtones.

Prairie Songbook special guest, Raine Hamilton

A word on the arrangements you’ll hear tonight: The Manitoba choral scene is blessed with an abundance of fine composers and arrangers. Philip Lapatha, conductor of Ecco; and Prairie Voices conductor, Geung Kroeker Lee, have been thrilling their audiences with new arrangements of recent pop offerings. Philip brings us imaginative new perspectives on Joni Mitchell and Ruth Moody songs, while Geung Kroeker Lee contributes funky arrangements of hits by local bands Begonia and Royal Canoe. Steven Webb, an award-winning film score and choral composer brings us tasty arrangements of more Manitoba hits by Imaginary Cities and JP Hoe, while Dan Wiebe, veteran WSO pop arranger and longtime lead singer for House of Doc, brings us an unexpected take on Neil Young and KD Lang.

Mel Braun and his son, Micah

I had the pleasure of creating new versions of familiar songs by The Guess Who, BTO, and Corb Lund, as well as arranging two favourite songs from my son Micah’s catalogue. Each of the arrangements heard tonight is by a Manitoban and ten of them are brand new. Of course, none of this would be possible without the amazing singers that constitute Camerata Nova. Whatever the style, these flexible musicians bring it to life with joy and integrity. Thank-you singers, our Prairie Hymns have never sounded better! We’ve had a great time exploring all these delightful and varied arrangements from the Prairie Songbook.  We can’t wait to share them with you. – Mel Braun

Mel Braun (forefront) and Vic Pankratz (left) lead the choir through a rehearsal for the Prairie Songbook

The Prairie Songbook will be performed twice on March 9 at 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm and again on March 10 at 3:00 pm at Park Theatre (698 Osborne) in Winnipeg.

Every few years, Camerata Nova likes to kick back to just have fun with friends and fans. For this special event, we will present great folk and pop standards as well as recent tunes by cool, local artists. From The Wailin’ Jennys to The Guess Who, from Joni Mitchell to Royal Canoe, from KD Lang to JP Hoe, we’ll celebrate our “wheatfield soul” in all its diversity. With the help of a 4-piece house band of talented musicians, Camerata Nova will turn the Park Theatre into your favourite coffee house. Come join us and blow away your winter blues!

TICKETS

Tickets are available online at cameratanova.com, at McNally Robinson Booksellers, by phone
(204.918.4547), or at the door. Purchase the last two concerts of Camerata Nova’s 2018-2019 season at the special price of $50 for adults, $40 for seniors and $20 for under 30s (or, for two, $90, $70 and $30). See cameratanova.com  for details.

DONATE

Camerata Nova is a registered not-for-profit charitable organization. Exploring, taking risks, and developing exciting new programming, takes time, energy, and money.

Click here to find out more about donating.

Blow Away Your Winter Blues with the Prairie Songbook

Camerata Nova and award-winning guest musician Raine Hamilton will be letting their hair down and opening a 20th century songbook to celebrate their modern prairie roots. Under the joint direction of Mel Braun and Vic Pankratz, the group’s second concert of the season will be a party to remember!

The Prairie Songbook will be performed twice on March 9 at 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm and again on March 10 at 3:00 pm at Park Theatre (698 Osborne) in Winnipeg.

Every few years, Camerata Nova likes to kick back to just have fun with friends and fans. For this special event, we will present great folk and pop standards as well as recent tunes by cool, local artists. From The Wailin’ Jennys to The Guess Who, from Joni Mitchell to Royal Canoe, from KD Lang to JP Hoe, we’ll celebrate our “wheatfield soul” in all its diversity. With the help of a 4-piece house band of talented musicians, Camerata Nova will turn the Park Theatre into your favourite coffee house. Come join us and blow away your winter blues!

TICKETS

Tickets are available online at cameratanova.com, at McNally Robinson Booksellers, by phone
(204.918.4547), or at the door. Purchase the last two concerts of Camerata Nova’s 2018-2019 season at the special price of $50 for adults, $40 for seniors and $20 for under 30s (or, for two, $90, $70 and $30). See cameratanova.com  for details.

DONATE

Camerata Nova is a registered not-for-profit charitable organization. Exploring, taking risks, and developing exciting new programming, takes time, energy, and money.

Click here to find out more about donating.

Raine Hamilton Joins us for The Prairie Songbook

Camerata Nova is excited to have 2018 Canadian Folk Music Award Winner for Emerging artist of the Year, Raine Hamilton, join us for our March 9+10 concert The Prairie Songbook. The concert takes place March 9, 2019 at 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm and March 10, 2019 at 3:00 pm at the Park Theatre. Tickets for individual concerts are available through our website, by phone (204-918-4547), or at the door.

Raine Hamilton – Resonant, acoustic chamber folk with an otherworldly edge, and a lyric presence that cuts deep. Prism-clear vocals and strings; A combination of vocal agility and power.

Raine Hamilton‘s new album, Night Sky, tips between the earthly and the otherworldly; it is anchored in relatable lived experience, while reaching into the space just beyond, thinning the veil between here and there, affording safe passage to the rough and beautiful places.

Raine’s ethereal voice and lyrics are at the forefront of these powerful and relatable tunes, written both in English and in French. Alongside cello + double bass, and with Raine on violin or guitar, these songs have a moving string quartet feel with a cosmic reach.

Raine is also a charming and funny storyteller, pairing her vulnerable tunes with engaging story intros. Raine believes that music is for everyone, and that we all have something to share. An experienced educator, Raine offers workshops in songwriting and fiddle tune writing (EN/FR). Raine also offers concerts with American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation, to help make live music and the community that comes with it accessible to the Deaf community.

Raine has toured Canada extensively, driving, flying, and floating her way coast to coast. Highlights include: Performing songs with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra (3 times!), playing a concert in a cave (10 stories below the earth!), playing festivals across Canada (Home County, Filberg Fest, Lilac Fest, The Works, Harvest Sun, Harvest Moon, Trout Forest), playing for her passage on Via Rail, and meeting so many amazing humans along the way. She reports a full and smiling heart <3.

Raine Hamilton’s new album, Night Sky, was released in March 2018

Check out and follow Raine on her socials: WebsiteYouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Spotify

The Prairie Songbook takes place March 9, 2019 at 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm and March 10, 2019 at 3:00 pm at the Park Theatre. Tickets for individual concerts are available through our website, by phone (204-918-4547), or at the door.

Every few years, we kick back to just have fun with friends and fans. For this special Park Theatre event, Camerata Nova will present a great selection of songs from prairie artists arranged by Manitoba composers/arrangers. From the Wailin’ Jennys to The Guess Who, from Joni Mitchel to Royal Canoe, from KD Lang to JP Hoe, we’ll celebrate our “wheatfield soul” in all its diversity.

Led by Mel Braun and Vic Pankratz and featuring a 4-piece house band of talented musicians, Camerata Nova will turn the Park Theatre into your favourite coffee house. Come join us and blow away your winter blues!

Video excerpts from Notinikew by Andrew Balfour

This past November 2018, Camerata Nova performed Fallen, the second concert in our Truth and Reconciliation series. Here’s what Camerata Nova’s Artistic Director, and Fallen composer, Andrew Balfour, had to say about it.

Artistic Director, and Fallen composer, Andrew Balfour

About three years ago, I became fascinated with the idea of marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I with a mini-opera on the founding of the 107th Timber Wolf Battalion in 1915.  It’s an amazing story about 1000 men, half settler and half indigenous, who fought together in some of the most famous battles of the Great War.


I Went to War / Poni pimacisiwin (the end of living) is an excerpt from Notinikew (Going to War) by Andrew Balfour with soloist and narrator Andrew Balfour, traditional Ojibway drummer-singer Cory Campbell, cellist Cris Derksen and the Winnipeg Boys’ Choir

At the same time as this was percolating, Camerata Nova decided to create a Truth and Reconciliation concert series, lasting over a number of years.  Each concert has a theme that resonates with Canadian indigenous experience and, over the series, we are inviting a range of incredible indigenous artists to collaborate with us.   Our first T&R concert was Taken, performed in Winnipeg and Ottawa in 2017, featuring Cree hip hop artist Lindsay Knight (Eekwol) and recent Polaris winner Jeremy Dutcher.

Fallen is our second.  It has evolved in a fascinating way.  On one hand, I have been delving into the other-world, terrifying experiences that Cree and Ojibway warriors in the Timber Wolves must have experienced in WWI, having no idea what it meant to enlist or why or how they came to be in the midst of the mud and gas in Europe.

On the other hand, as I read literature and poetry from ordinary individuals in Europe at the time, I was also deeply touched by the profound helplessness and sadness they felt as their sons, brothers – and themselves – fell victim to such prolonged, useless and outrageous slaughter.

Fallen is a deeply felt anti-war concert, not just focussed on “the war to end all wars” but on those before, those after and, tragically, on the wars yet to come.


Kakichiwewan is an excerpt from Notinikew (Going to War) by Andrew Balfour with soloist and narrator Andrew Balfour, traditional Ojibway drummer-singer Cory Campbell, cellist Cris Derksen and the Winnipeg Boys’ Choir

There is no better way to open this concert than with a traditional Prayer Song from Ojibway friend and Song Keeper, Cory Campbell.  He performs with a straightforward purity, humility and strength that grounds and guides me as I straddle settler and indigenous worlds.  Thank you, Cory, for your openness, your help with language and the example you set for how I should approach my music and my life.

Notinikew:  I wrote this work over the summer while I was in St. John’s Newfoundland, then Toronto, then Temagami in Northern Ontario and, finally, in the Herdsman House Artist Retreat in Neubergthal, south of Winnipeg.  It’s been quite a journey – in all senses.  My original idea was to write a partly fictional mini opera about the story of the Timber Wolves, but this morphed into a more abstract choral drama.  Scored for adult choir, treble choir, baritone solo/performance artist, cello and traditional drummer-singer, Notinikew is an anti-war piece, an indigenous identity piece – a tragedy that speaks not just about World War I, but all wars and all indigenous soldiers.

Why did these Indigenous warriors leave our forests and plains to enter a totally foreign military world and end up fighting in the midst of a true hell on earth?  It’s very difficult to find good source material. I’ve been studying old pictures and gleaning the odd article, but I’ve also used my imagination to express the experience/feelings of people I’ve never met with as much integrity and respect as I can. I think of the shock, disorientation and horror that would have marked these men for their entire lives.  I think also of their re-entry to Canada.  As skilled sappers and snipers, they were accepted and respected by their white counterparts.  When they returned home, they went back to the degrading label of “Indian”, receiving none of the benefits or recognition of other Canadian soldiers.  Plus, they were often ostracized by their own communities because they had taken the side of the government.  As the Narrator says near the end of Notinikew: “Where is our place in your history?  Where?”

Notinikew was difficult to write but also magical and important.  It is an honour to try, in my own way, to tell the stories of our people.  In addition to Cory, my guide and compass, I want to thank Cris Derksen who is so talented and creative – this collaboration has been so much fun, and I think it’s just the start…  Also, I could not do these ambitious projects without Mel Braun.  He “gets” me and what we are trying to do and has respect for all around him.  He is not afraid of experimentation and undefined elements and magically, calmly pulls it all together.

Finally, Notinikew is dedicated to my partner, Sara Roque, and her Richardson family.  You have opened your doors and opened up my life.  You have given me a new, powerful understandings of what it means to be indigenous.  Best of all, you have given me patience and love. – Andrew Balfour, October 27, 2018

 

Upcoming Concerts – The Prairie Songbook and Death by Chocolate: The Life and Death of Henry Purcell

The Prairie Songbook 
March 9, 2019 at 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm and March 10, 2019 at 3:00 pm at the Park Theatre

Every few years, we kick back to just have fun with friends and fans. For this special Park Theatre event, Camerata Nova will present great folk and pop standards as well as recent tunes by cool, local artists. From the Wailin’ Jennys to The Guess Who, from Joni Mitchell to Royal Canoe, from KD Lang to JP Hoe, we’ll celebrate our “wheatfield soul” in all its diversity.

Led by Mel Braun and Vic Pankratz and featuring a 4-piece house band of talented musicians, Camerata Nova will turn the Park Theatre into your favourite coffee house. Come join us and blow away your winter blues!

Death by Chocolate: The Life and Death of Henry Purcell
May 4, 2019 at 7:30 pm and May 5, 2019 at 3:00 pm at Crescent Fort Rouge United Church (Pre-concert talks at 6:45 pm on Saturday and 2:15 pm on Sunday)

In this concert curated and conducted by John Wiens, Camerata Nova seeks to showcase choral works by Henry Purcell (1659-1695) and to explore the life of this composer, arguably the greatest of the English Baroque period. Join us to find out how cocoa can kill…

Death by Chocolate offers top quality performers and powerful repertoire – a rare musical treat. Four Winnipeg vocal soloists: Dayna Lamothe, soprano, Jane Fingler, soprano, James Magnus-Johnson, tenor, and Jereme Wall, bass will be joined by early music instrumentalists Claudine St-Arnauld, violin, Jeremy Buzasch, violin, Greg Hay, viola, Yuri Hooker, cello, Andrew Goodlett, bass, and Michael McKay, organ continuo. To add a star attraction and flair to the concert, we are also bringing in the exciting young Canadian countertenor, Daniel Cabena, who specializes in early and contemporary performance.  The countertenor voice has a caché and curiosity that is sure to send many a heart afflutter.  Repertoire will include: Rondeau from Abdelazar; O Sing unto the Lord; My Heart Is Inditing; Hear My Prayer, O Lord; Te Deum and Jubilate in D; plus Three Funeral Sentences.

Tickets

Tickets for individual concerts are available through our website, by phone (204-918-4547), or at the door. Two-concert mini-packages are also available ($35, $30, $20, or for two, $65, $55, $35). Individual ticket prices available on our website.

Donate

Camerata Nova is a registered not-for-profit charitable organization. Exploring, taking risks, and developing exciting new programming, takes time, energy, and money.

Click here to find out more about donating.

 

Giving Tuesday

Give the joy of music this giving season…

Tuesday, November 27, 2018, is Giving Tuesday, the international philanthropic movement that unites communities to bring about real change by encouraging people and charities to work together.

We are proud to count you among our valued partners. Music lovers from all over recognize Camerata Nova, vocal group without fear, as one of our community’s most prized musical institutions. Since 1996, we’ve continued to push the envelope, offering early music performances, premiers of Manitoba compositions, and an eclectic array in between.
 
The impact of your support is truly extraordinary. With your help, for the past three years, Camerata Nova’s artistic director, Andrew Balfour, who is of Cree descent, has been able to bring the gift of music north to the smaller, more remote schools that do not have formal music education programs, and teach students there how to create and perform their own soundscapes to describe their community, their family or the land around them.
 
And thanks to you, Camerata Nova is presenting outstanding performances season after season, including a multi-year series of truly impactful truth and reconciliation concerts. Whether supporting our outreach efforts, programming or operations, you make it all happen! Your tax-deductible donation to Camerata Nova brings about real and lasting change.
 
What difference are YOU making this giving season? Please consider Camerata Nova for a donation today. Your end-of-year support will help empower hundreds of students this school year, enabling these children to express themselves through the joy of music.

   
Offrez la joie de la musique en cette saison de générosité….
 
Le mardi 27 novembre 2018, c’est « Mardi, je donne », le mouvement philanthropique international qui unit les communautés dans le but d’apporter de réels changements en encourageant les gens et les organismes de bienfaisance à travailler ensemble.
 
Nous sommes fiers de vous compter parmi nos précieux partenaires. Les mélomanes de partout reconnaissent Camerata Nova, groupe vocal intrépide, comme l’une des institutions musicales les plus prisées de notre communauté. Depuis 1996, nous n’avons cessé de repousser les limites de son répertoire, offrant des prestations de musique ancienne, des premières de compositions manitobaines et un assortiment des plus éclectiques entre les deux.
 
L’impact de votre soutien est vraiment remarquable. Avec votre aide, depuis trois ans, le directeur artistique de Camerata Nova, Andrew Balfour, qui est d’origine crie, a été en mesure d’apporter le don de la musique dans des écoles plus petites et plus éloignées  qui n’ont pas de programmes officiels d’éducation musicale et d’enseigner aux élèves comment créer et interpréter leur propre paysage sonore pour décrire leur communauté, leur famille ou la terre qui les entoure.
 
Et grâce à vous, Camerata Nova présente des concerts exceptionnels, saison après saison, y compris une série pluriannuelle de concerts saisissants sur le thème de la vérité et de la réconciliation qui ont eu un véritable impact. Qu’il s’agisse d’appuyer nos activités de rayonnement, de programmation ou d’exploitation, c’est vous qui faites en sorte que tout se concrétise! Votre don déductible d’impôt à Camerata Nova apporte un changement réel et durable.
 
Quel impact avez-VOUS en cette saison de générosité? Veuillez envisager de faire un don à Camerata Nova aujourd’hui. Votre soutien de fin d’année aidera des centaines d’élèves à s’exprimer à travers la joie de la musique au cours de cette année scolaire.

Click here to find out more about donating to Camerata Nova and other fantastic charities today.